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Social Science - African American Studies
 
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By Bob Stewart
What if you were a renowned astronomer, mathematician, engineer, musician, and surveyor with an extraordinary memory? What if you were admired by Benjamin Franklin, needed by President Washington, and resented by Thomas Jefferson? Now, what if you were a free black? How would you navigate through the narrow straights of Colonial America? After the war of Independence, the South is threatening separation from the North regarding one currency. Washington instructs Jefferson to build the nation’s capital in the South in exchange for the votes needed to unite the colonies which is a precarious position for Jefferson: he must commission Benjamin Banneker. Libby is a beautiful angel capable of turning into a demon from hell in the blink of an eye. Because she’s white, the two have been clandestine lovers since childhood. Libby senses a mulatto life forming inside of her induced by Benjamin which can mean his demise. Meanwhile, he meets Livia, who is a somewhat free slave and strikingly attractive. Their intense love culminates, and chaos ensues. This latest novel from author Bob Stewart is an emotional and stunning drama that will instill the hopes, dreams, and raw human needs of the free black who built the first clock in America; produced the designs for Washington, DC; and went on to publish his own self-computed almanacs.
FORMAT: Softcover
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By Raymond C. Christian
Children working the cocoa plantations for America’s chocolate. Would you ever dream of such abuse happening to five-year-old boys and girls, children being worked worse than animals on the cocoa plantations to get the cocoa bean, the main ingredient in chocolate, to America. The cocoa beans are covered with the blood, sweat, and tears of five-year-old children sold for slave labor to work on the cocoa plantations. Everyone has limited freedoms, even in America. We protect our children. They don’t have to work on cocoa plantations like five-year-old children in Africa. What should we do about the children who are being abused? Laws are in place. The International Labor Organization, Convention laws, and the Convention of the Rights of the Child, these laws are not being enforced. American people want chocolate but are not aware of the abuse taking place on the Ivory Coast of Africa and Ghana, where 60 percent of the cocoa beans in the world are produced on the cocoa plantations. The cocoa plantations on the Ivory Coast of Africa and Ghana are noted as being the worst form of child slavery in the history of the world. Five-year-old children are working one hundred hours a week. Children are sold into slavery and will never have a childhood or education. Children working to get cocoa beans to America so the chocolate industries can produce chocolate while ignoring the laws in place. Five-year-old children are being raped, sodomized, beaten with bike chains, and possibly murdered trying to escape the cocoa plantations? Chocolate is a trillion-dollar industry. Five-year-old children are being used as child sex slaves, in sex trafficking, and organ trafficking? Why, America, why? Please help the children!
FORMAT: E-Book
OUR PRICE:
$3.99
By Raymond C. Christian
Children working the cocoa plantations for America’s chocolate. Would you ever dream of such abuse happening to five-year-old boys and girls, children being worked worse than animals on the cocoa plantations to get the cocoa bean, the main ingredient in chocolate, to America. The cocoa beans are covered with the blood, sweat, and tears of five-year-old children sold for slave labor to work on the cocoa plantations. Everyone has limited freedoms, even in America. We protect our children. They don’t have to work on cocoa plantations like five-year-old children in Africa. What should we do about the children who are being abused? Laws are in place. The International Labor Organization, Convention laws, and the Convention of the Rights of the Child, these laws are not being enforced. American people want chocolate but are not aware of the abuse taking place on the Ivory Coast of Africa and Ghana, where 60 percent of the cocoa beans in the world are produced on the cocoa plantations. The cocoa plantations on the Ivory Coast of Africa and Ghana are noted as being the worst form of child slavery in the history of the world. Five-year-old children are working one hundred hours a week. Children are sold into slavery and will never have a childhood or education. Children working to get cocoa beans to America so the chocolate industries can produce chocolate while ignoring the laws in place. Five-year-old children are being raped, sodomized, beaten with bike chains, and possibly murdered trying to escape the cocoa plantations? Chocolate is a trillion-dollar industry. Five-year-old children are being used as child sex slaves, in sex trafficking, and organ trafficking? Why, America, why? Please help the children!
FORMAT: Softcover
OUR PRICE:
$21.99
By Raymond C. Christian
Children working the cocoa plantations for America’s chocolate. Would you ever dream of such abuse happening to five-year-old boys and girls, children being worked worse than animals on the cocoa plantations to get the cocoa bean, the main ingredient in chocolate, to America. The cocoa beans are covered with the blood, sweat, and tears of five-year-old children sold for slave labor to work on the cocoa plantations. Everyone has limited freedoms, even in America. We protect our children. They don’t have to work on cocoa plantations like five-year-old children in Africa. What should we do about the children who are being abused? Laws are in place. The International Labor Organization, Convention laws, and the Convention of the Rights of the Child, these laws are not being enforced. American people want chocolate but are not aware of the abuse taking place on the Ivory Coast of Africa and Ghana, where 60 percent of the cocoa beans in the world are produced on the cocoa plantations. The cocoa plantations on the Ivory Coast of Africa and Ghana are noted as being the worst form of child slavery in the history of the world. Five-year-old children are working one hundred hours a week. Children are sold into slavery and will never have a childhood or education. Children working to get cocoa beans to America so the chocolate industries can produce chocolate while ignoring the laws in place. Five-year-old children are being raped, sodomized, beaten with bike chains, and possibly murdered trying to escape the cocoa plantations? Chocolate is a trillion-dollar industry. Five-year-old children are being used as child sex slaves, in sex trafficking, and organ trafficking? Why, America, why? Please help the children!
FORMAT: Hardcover
OUR PRICE:
$34.99
By José Clavot Joz'
On January 1815, colonel Savary, a free man of color, and his Battalion fought back the britishs troops who were attempting to invade the city of New Orleans. On the battle field suddenly appears a young slave who had fled a plantation..
FORMAT: Hardcover
OUR PRICE:
$26.99
By José Clavot Joz'
On January 1815, colonel Savary, a free man of color, and his Battalion fought back the britishs troops who were attempting to invade the city of New Orleans. On the battle field suddenly appears a young slave who had fled a plantation..
FORMAT: E-Book
OUR PRICE:
$3.99
By José Clavot Joz'
On January 1815, colonel Savary, a free man of color, and his Battalion fought back the britishs troops who were attempting to invade the city of New Orleans. On the battle field suddenly appears a young slave who had fled a plantation..
FORMAT: Softcover
OUR PRICE:
$17.99
By Charles G. Ankrom
Slogans such as “Black Lives Matter” and “Hands Up, Don’t Shoot” dominate the news, but the likes of Trayvon Martin and Michael Brown are hardly poster boys for a new civil rights movement. The silent white majority is tired of dealing with blacks who look, talk, and act like Brown’s stepfather. The moment after the grand jury decided not to indict the police officer who fatally shot his son, he vehemently urged onlookers to “burn this bitch down.” Charles G. Ankrom takes a candid look at race relations in an effort defeat the ugly monster of racism. He considers questions such as: • Why is it always presumed that whites discriminate against blacks when a cry of racism is heard? • And why are these stories so prevalent in today’s media? • Why do hate crimes seem only to get filed against whites even though blacks constantly assault whites with cries of “Justice for Trayvon” and “Remember Michael Brown”? • Why does society pander to blacks with things such as Black History Month? Consider tough questions, and change the dialogue on race in America with the insights in Black Pandering.
FORMAT: E-Book
OUR PRICE:
$3.99
By Charles G. Ankrom
Slogans such as “Black Lives Matter” and “Hands Up, Don’t Shoot” dominate the news, but the likes of Trayvon Martin and Michael Brown are hardly poster boys for a new civil rights movement. The silent white majority is tired of dealing with blacks who look, talk, and act like Brown’s stepfather. The moment after the grand jury decided not to indict the police officer who fatally shot his son, he vehemently urged onlookers to “burn this bitch down.” Charles G. Ankrom takes a candid look at race relations in an effort defeat the ugly monster of racism. He considers questions such as: • Why is it always presumed that whites discriminate against blacks when a cry of racism is heard? • And why are these stories so prevalent in today’s media? • Why do hate crimes seem only to get filed against whites even though blacks constantly assault whites with cries of “Justice for Trayvon” and “Remember Michael Brown”? • Why does society pander to blacks with things such as Black History Month? Consider tough questions, and change the dialogue on race in America with the insights in Black Pandering.
FORMAT: Softcover
OUR PRICE:
$19.95
By Jacqueline T. Small
Freedomtown is a quiet little town located west of Philadelphia. It was founded by a fugitive slave named Samuel Freeman, who also wrote the town charter, back in 1862. Sheriff Michael Freeman, who is a descendant of the Freeman clan, is charged with keeping Freedomtown safe. He is the youngest sheriff that has ever been appointed, and he has a lot to prove. The Freedomtown Charter prohibits potential residents with a criminal background from residing in the town, but sometimes people slip through the cracks and cause the townspeople to be...living on the edge in Freedomtown. Stone Money Jones is living a double life in Freedomtown. He is the product of a dysfunctional family, which steers him in the wrong directions. It is up to Sheriff Freeman to solve the mystery and restore safety and security to this quiet little town.
FORMAT: E-Book
OUR PRICE:
$3.99
By Gabriel Malzaire
This book focuses on the Caribbean church in its attempt to unravel the significance of the Christ-Event in the Caribbean context. The Challenges for the Catholic Christian in the New Millennium (Part I) articulates the major concerns of the Caribbean church under three main themes, namely, relevance, authenticity, and evangelization. These are presented as the evangelical posture needed for the contemporary period. Christ and Ethnicity in the Caribbean (Part II) attempts, through the use of the notion of the incarnation, to unravel the concept of Christ as Saviour in the Caribbean context. It attempts to show that genuine Caribbean theology is a reflection on the Christ-Event in the lives of its people. It is geared toward helping Caribbean Christians develop a greater sense of self-worth. It purports that Christology must be related to the identity of a people if it is to engender effective pastoral action. Toward a Caribbean Christian Civilization (Part III) gives a comprehensive view of the Caribbean reality in which Christianity is lived. It takes into account the influence of the history of the region, the effects of colonialism, the evolution of its culture(s), its ethnic composition and the dispositions that surrounded it, the challenge of traditional religious elements, and the moral question in its varied dimensions. Finally, it presents some suggestions on what a Caribbean Christian civilization should look like if it is to carry out the mandate of Christ. A Theological Reflection on "Bamboo Bursting" in the Caribbean serves as a postscript. It unravels the meaning of this pre-Christmas pastime in some of the territories of the Caribbean. Short though it may be, the collection provides a fair understanding of the Caribbean church’s experience and its responsibility to be a leaven in the midst of God's people in its particular context.
FORMAT: E-Book
OUR PRICE:
$3.99
By Jacqueline T. Small
Freedomtown is a quiet little town located west of Philadelphia. It was founded by a fugitive slave named Samuel Freeman, who also wrote the town charter, back in 1862. Sheriff Michael Freeman, who is a descendant of the Freeman clan, is charged with keeping Freedomtown safe. He is the youngest sheriff that has ever been appointed, and he has a lot to prove. The Freedomtown Charter prohibits potential residents with a criminal background from residing in the town, but sometimes people slip through the cracks and cause the townspeople to be...living on the edge in Freedomtown. Stone Money Jones is living a double life in Freedomtown. He is the product of a dysfunctional family, which steers him in the wrong directions. It is up to Sheriff Freeman to solve the mystery and restore safety and security to this quiet little town.
FORMAT: Softcover
OUR PRICE:
$14.95
By Gabriel Malzaire
This book focuses on the Caribbean church in its attempt to unravel the significance of the Christ-Event in the Caribbean context. The Challenges for the Catholic Christian in the New Millennium (Part I) articulates the major concerns of the Caribbean church under three main themes, namely, relevance, authenticity, and evangelization. These are presented as the evangelical posture needed for the contemporary period. Christ and Ethnicity in the Caribbean (Part II) attempts, through the use of the notion of the incarnation, to unravel the concept of Christ as Saviour in the Caribbean context. It attempts to show that genuine Caribbean theology is a reflection on the Christ-Event in the lives of its people. It is geared toward helping Caribbean Christians develop a greater sense of self-worth. It purports that Christology must be related to the identity of a people if it is to engender effective pastoral action. Toward a Caribbean Christian Civilization (Part III) gives a comprehensive view of the Caribbean reality in which Christianity is lived. It takes into account the influence of the history of the region, the effects of colonialism, the evolution of its culture(s), its ethnic composition and the dispositions that surrounded it, the challenge of traditional religious elements, and the moral question in its varied dimensions. Finally, it presents some suggestions on what a Caribbean Christian civilization should look like if it is to carry out the mandate of Christ. A Theological Reflection on "Bamboo Bursting" in the Caribbean serves as a postscript. It unravels the meaning of this pre-Christmas pastime in some of the territories of the Caribbean. Short though it may be, the collection provides a fair understanding of the Caribbean church’s experience and its responsibility to be a leaven in the midst of God's people in its particular context.
FORMAT: Softcover
OUR PRICE:
$14.95
By Lawrence D. Taplah
This is about racial profiling in Liberia, and I feel it would be suitable for everybody to know about. Throughout the existing accusatory writing, sometimes Liberians and foreigners have dominant thought about whether racial profiling is ingrained in the people. The founding of Liberia has exalted the descendants of American black free slaves at the expense of descendants of African natives. The accusation of manipulation by each group has intensified the divisiveness of Liberians. Such outflow of hostility has amounted to many wars and the interlocking system to belong in a group for an identity. I want Liberians and non-Liberians to read my book for the capsule of racial profiling, which started in 1821 by agents of the American Colonization Society during an undetermined event and into the twenty-first century.
FORMAT: E-Book
OUR PRICE:
$3.99
By Lawrence D. Taplah
This is about racial profiling in Liberia, and I feel it would be suitable for everybody to know about. Throughout the existing accusatory writing, sometimes Liberians and foreigners have dominant thought about whether racial profiling is ingrained in the people. The founding of Liberia has exalted the descendants of American black free slaves at the expense of descendants of African natives. The accusation of manipulation by each group has intensified the divisiveness of Liberians. Such outflow of hostility has amounted to many wars and the interlocking system to belong in a group for an identity. I want Liberians and non-Liberians to read my book for the capsule of racial profiling, which started in 1821 by agents of the American Colonization Society during an undetermined event and into the twenty-first century.
FORMAT: Softcover
OUR PRICE:
$11.95