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History - Military (General)
 
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By Adrienne Fox
Adrienne Fox is a retired musician who began her literary career reviewing concerts. This is her fifth novel. The other novels are the following: The Retirement, Starstruck, Tit for Tat, and IQ. Adrienne Fox writes about life in Britain from 1941–1963, when old traditions came head-to-head with new ideas as wartime austerity gave way to the Swinging Sixties. She colorfully describes growing up in a constant conflict of the morals, views, and opinions at a time when material goods were in short supply, conversation took the place of electronic entertainment, and serious communication was restricted to letter writing. Through wry humor, she tells of her efforts to understand family conflicts and of her own ill-formed ambitions. Desperately wanting to please in order to “keep the peace” but frequently appearing to fall short, “Can’t do right for doing wrong” aptly describes periods of her progress. Her story paints a tragic-comic picture of the incidents and attitudes within the time frame beginning in a northern industrial town, where the ration books vied with the hymn books in the family home, to college life in London and trying to find a job.
FORMAT: E-Book
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By Adrienne Fox
Adrienne Fox is a retired musician who began her literary career reviewing concerts. This is her fifth novel. The other novels are the following: The Retirement, Starstruck, Tit for Tat, and IQ. Adrienne Fox writes about life in Britain from 1941–1963, when old traditions came head-to-head with new ideas as wartime austerity gave way to the Swinging Sixties. She colorfully describes growing up in a constant conflict of the morals, views, and opinions at a time when material goods were in short supply, conversation took the place of electronic entertainment, and serious communication was restricted to letter writing. Through wry humor, she tells of her efforts to understand family conflicts and of her own ill-formed ambitions. Desperately wanting to please in order to “keep the peace” but frequently appearing to fall short, “Can’t do right for doing wrong” aptly describes periods of her progress. Her story paints a tragic-comic picture of the incidents and attitudes within the time frame beginning in a northern industrial town, where the ration books vied with the hymn books in the family home, to college life in London and trying to find a job.
FORMAT: Softcover
OUR PRICE:
$15.18
By Leo LePage
This is a book about the Marine Corp from the characters making a decision to enter to boot camp to the training to become a Recon Marine.
FORMAT: E-Book
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By Shirley Fish
When the Centurion and a squadron of six vessels and 1,959 men and boys set out from England in 1740, on a round-the-world expedition, they were unaware of the terrifying events that awaited them in the days ahead. The squadron, under the command of Commodore George Anson, had departed from England with every hope of a successful mission to harass and take prizes in the Spanish possessions of the Americas and in Asia. The journey proved more challenging than anticipated, and at times, it seemed nightmarish and beyond anything experienced by the crew. The ship survived two huge waves and a lightning strike. Then, there was the great loss of life amongst the crew who perished due to the devastating symptoms of scurvy. Despite these setbacks, there were moments of pure joy, especially when the Centurion captured the fabulously wealthy Manila-Acapulco Galleon in the Philippines, the Nuestra Senora de Covadonga. Throughout the Centurion's career as a royal naval warship in the eighteenth century, she played a role in the capture of Quebec during the French and Indian War and the invasion of Havana in the Seven Years War. She was also instrumental when dealing with the Barbary Corsairs of Algeria and Morocco. Amongst the famous men who sailed on this vessel were John Harrison, the inventor of the first maritime sea clock, and Joshua Reynolds, the celebrated portrait painter. The details of the journeys to the Americas, Asia, and Europe are described in this biographical-travelogue of the Centurion.
FORMAT: E-Book
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By Leo LePage
This is a book about the Marine Corp from the characters making a decision to enter to boot camp to the training to become a Recon Marine.
FORMAT: Softcover
OUR PRICE:
$23.95
By Shirley Fish
When the Centurion and a squadron of six vessels and 1,959 men and boys set out from England in 1740, on a round-the-world expedition, they were unaware of the terrifying events that awaited them in the days ahead. The squadron, under the command of Commodore George Anson, had departed from England with every hope of a successful mission to harass and take prizes in the Spanish possessions of the Americas and in Asia. The journey proved more challenging than anticipated, and at times, it seemed nightmarish and beyond anything experienced by the crew. The ship survived two huge waves and a lightning strike. Then, there was the great loss of life amongst the crew who perished due to the devastating symptoms of scurvy. Despite these setbacks, there were moments of pure joy, especially when the Centurion captured the fabulously wealthy Manila-Acapulco Galleon in the Philippines, the Nuestra Senora de Covadonga. Throughout the Centurion's career as a royal naval warship in the eighteenth century, she played a role in the capture of Quebec during the French and Indian War and the invasion of Havana in the Seven Years War. She was also instrumental when dealing with the Barbary Corsairs of Algeria and Morocco. Amongst the famous men who sailed on this vessel were John Harrison, the inventor of the first maritime sea clock, and Joshua Reynolds, the celebrated portrait painter. The details of the journeys to the Americas, Asia, and Europe are described in this biographical-travelogue of the Centurion.
FORMAT: Softcover
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$28.92
By Shirley Fish
When the Centurion and a squadron of six vessels and 1,959 men and boys set out from England in 1740, on a round-the-world expedition, they were unaware of the terrifying events that awaited them in the days ahead. The squadron, under the command of Commodore George Anson, had departed from England with every hope of a successful mission to harass and take prizes in the Spanish possessions of the Americas and in Asia. The journey proved more challenging than anticipated, and at times, it seemed nightmarish and beyond anything experienced by the crew. The ship survived two huge waves and a lightning strike. Then, there was the great loss of life amongst the crew who perished due to the devastating symptoms of scurvy. Despite these setbacks, there were moments of pure joy, especially when the Centurion captured the fabulously wealthy Manila-Acapulco Galleon in the Philippines, the Nuestra Senora de Covadonga. Throughout the Centurion's career as a royal naval warship in the eighteenth century, she played a role in the capture of Quebec during the French and Indian War and the invasion of Havana in the Seven Years War. She was also instrumental when dealing with the Barbary Corsairs of Algeria and Morocco. Amongst the famous men who sailed on this vessel were John Harrison, the inventor of the first maritime sea clock, and Joshua Reynolds, the celebrated portrait painter. The details of the journeys to the Americas, Asia, and Europe are described in this biographical-travelogue of the Centurion.
FORMAT: Hardcover
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$45.77
By Jeremy Shonick
CESAR’S WARS is based on the true story of Roberto César Montiel, a Special Forces soldier and CIA operative who made American history for 35 years: The Portable Atomic Bomb. The creation of Special Forces. The Bay of Pigs. The School of the Americas. Korea. Vietnam. Operation Phoenix. Operation Condor. The Contras. Non-official Cover. Interrogations. Torture. Through it all, his family paid the price. There were other women. PTSD. Alcoholism and abuse. In the end, the violence always comes first circle. “You’re like a Mafia wife,” his oldest son tells his mother. “The more dad kills, the more you pray.” CESAR’S WARS is also the tale of a first generation American family that struggles to endure the sacrifices and understand the sins committed in the name of God, country, democracy and empire. From the rebuilding of post-war Europe and Japan, through the turbulent 1960s, and the covert South American operations of the 1980s and beyond, this is the story of a family and a nation in crisis.
FORMAT: E-Book
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By Jeremy Shonick
CESAR’S WARS is based on the true story of Roberto César Montiel, a Special Forces soldier and CIA operative who made American history for 35 years: The Portable Atomic Bomb. The creation of Special Forces. The Bay of Pigs. The School of the Americas. Korea. Vietnam. Operation Phoenix. Operation Condor. The Contras. Non-official Cover. Interrogations. Torture. Through it all, his family paid the price. There were other women. PTSD. Alcoholism and abuse. In the end, the violence always comes first circle. “You’re like a Mafia wife,” his oldest son tells his mother. “The more dad kills, the more you pray.” CESAR’S WARS is also the tale of a first generation American family that struggles to endure the sacrifices and understand the sins committed in the name of God, country, democracy and empire. From the rebuilding of post-war Europe and Japan, through the turbulent 1960s, and the covert South American operations of the 1980s and beyond, this is the story of a family and a nation in crisis.
FORMAT: Softcover
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$26.95
By Leo V. Kanawada, Jr.

CAPTAIN, INFANTRY

A Vietnam War Memoir

The mid-1960s witnesses scores of college men being sworn in as second lieutenants in the U.S. Army. Leo V. Kanawada, Jr., was one of these ROTC graduates.

In 1965, Kanawada journeys to Fort Benning to participate in the Infantry Officers Basic Course. With an emphasis on jungle warfare and small unit and platoon tactics, it is obvious that the war in Vietnam would be his stomping grounds for the next thirteen months. When he receives orders to report to board a plane to Korea, he is taken aback. For the year of 1966, Kanawada describes his duties and activities as an infantry officer with the Second Infantry Division. From Support Command to Headquarters Company commander to the supervisory officer of the division’s 1,600 Korean Service Corps workers, he becomes acutely aware of Korea’s history, its present hopes and fears, and the defensive role which the United States plays in what he calls America’s Korea Model.

First Lieutenant Kanawada volunteers in late 1966 to serve another year in Vietnam. He is assigned to the 71st Assault Helicopter Company as an administrative officer, occasionally volunteering for numerous military assault missions in the III Corps and southern sector of Vietnam as a door gunner. To see the country, he says, and the war up close.

Later, he submits papers requesting to serve as a platoon leader. He travels up north to I Corps and the 196th Light Infantry Brigade. As a platoon leader and later as a captain in the headquarters operations bunker of the 3/21st Infantry Battalion, he sees the war up close in the central highlands. With insights from prominent military historians blended together with the author’s recollections and about 300 photos, every reader will receive a memorable portrait of a period of time that played such a crucial role in American foreign policy. Leo V. Kanawada, Jr.


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By Leo V. Kanawada, Jr.

CAPTAIN, INFANTRY

A Vietnam War Memoir

The mid-1960s witnesses scores of college men being sworn in as second lieutenants in the U.S. Army. Leo V. Kanawada, Jr., was one of these ROTC graduates.

In 1965, Kanawada journeys to Fort Benning to participate in the Infantry Officers Basic Course. With an emphasis on jungle warfare and small unit and platoon tactics, it is obvious that the war in Vietnam would be his stomping grounds for the next thirteen months. When he receives orders to report to board a plane to Korea, he is taken aback. For the year of 1966, Kanawada describes his duties and activities as an infantry officer with the Second Infantry Division. From Support Command to Headquarters Company commander to the supervisory officer of the division’s 1,600 Korean Service Corps workers, he becomes acutely aware of Korea’s history, its present hopes and fears, and the defensive role which the United States plays in what he calls America’s Korea Model.

First Lieutenant Kanawada volunteers in late 1966 to serve another year in Vietnam. He is assigned to the 71st Assault Helicopter Company as an administrative officer, occasionally volunteering for numerous military assault missions in the III Corps and southern sector of Vietnam as a door gunner. To see the country, he says, and the war up close.

Later, he submits papers requesting to serve as a platoon leader. He travels up north to I Corps and the 196th Light Infantry Brigade. As a platoon leader and later as a captain in the headquarters operations bunker of the 3/21st Infantry Battalion, he sees the war up close in the central highlands. With insights from prominent military historians blended together with the author’s recollections and about 300 photos, every reader will receive a memorable portrait of a period of time that played such a crucial role in American foreign policy. Leo V. Kanawada, Jr.


FORMAT: Softcover
OUR PRICE:
$23.95
By Leo V. Kanawada, Jr.

CAPTAIN, INFANTRY

A Vietnam War Memoir

The mid-1960s witnesses scores of college men being sworn in as second lieutenants in the U.S. Army. Leo V. Kanawada, Jr., was one of these ROTC graduates.

In 1965, Kanawada journeys to Fort Benning to participate in the Infantry Officers Basic Course. With an emphasis on jungle warfare and small unit and platoon tactics, it is obvious that the war in Vietnam would be his stomping grounds for the next thirteen months. When he receives orders to report to board a plane to Korea, he is taken aback. For the year of 1966, Kanawada describes his duties and activities as an infantry officer with the Second Infantry Division. From Support Command to Headquarters Company commander to the supervisory officer of the division’s 1,600 Korean Service Corps workers, he becomes acutely aware of Korea’s history, its present hopes and fears, and the defensive role which the United States plays in what he calls America’s Korea Model.

First Lieutenant Kanawada volunteers in late 1966 to serve another year in Vietnam. He is assigned to the 71st Assault Helicopter Company as an administrative officer, occasionally volunteering for numerous military assault missions in the III Corps and southern sector of Vietnam as a door gunner. To see the country, he says, and the war up close.

Later, he submits papers requesting to serve as a platoon leader. He travels up north to I Corps and the 196th Light Infantry Brigade. As a platoon leader and later as a captain in the headquarters operations bunker of the 3/21st Infantry Battalion, he sees the war up close in the central highlands. With insights from prominent military historians blended together with the author’s recollections and about 300 photos, every reader will receive a memorable portrait of a period of time that played such a crucial role in American foreign policy. Leo V. Kanawada, Jr.


FORMAT: Hardcover
OUR PRICE:
$31.99
By Joseph Guillet
This is a compilation of graffiti from our military heroes, expressing they true feelings in their Port-of-Johns in Iraq 2005-2008."
FORMAT: E-Book
OUR PRICE:
$3.99
By Bernard F. Flynn

A World War II Merchant Marine combat veteran does more than just rock the boat with this book. This grandpa opens up a can of worms that should cause some “squirming” in high places, past, present, or future.

1. Kennedy’s assassination, Oswald, the State Department, Congress, and big name personalities are all featured and highlighted in Grandpa’s story within.

2. Accusations of a “criminal law” that was enacted by the wartime Congress, which removed every government benefit that the early volunteers for the Merchant Marine had and reclassified them as migrant workers.

3. Why was there acceptance of the never-ending scapegoating of these brave heroes, which was nothing but pure, self-serving lies and distortions by the press, broadcast media, politicians, and higher-ups in the military?

4. Read the absolute truth about the Merchant Marine that is related in this book. You can make up your own mind about the wartime Merchant Marine. Their wartime contribution to winning that war is incontrovertible. Why was the report to President Truman at the end of the war kept a war secret and not made available until 2009, sixty-five years later?

5. Read the author’s take on the wartime start-up of his alma mater, the United States Merchant Marine Academy at Kings Point, New York, which is now considered the hidden treasure of our federal academies.

6. It is doubtful if any of our seamen, especially our African American volunteers, understood what really happened in the wartime Congress. Those thousands of widows and children who lost all benefits should force a federal disclosure of the facts, and the hope of this book is to put them all on full alert. The disclaimer and speculation is clearly indicated in the early part of this book. Read President Obama’s response.


FORMAT: E-Book
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By Joseph Guillet
This is a compilation of graffiti from our military heroes, expressing they true feelings in their Port-of-Johns in Iraq 2005-2008."
FORMAT: Softcover
OUR PRICE:
$16.95