Finance
 
Resumes
 
Skills
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Essays
 
Finance
 
Higher
 
History
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Drama
 
Grammar
 
Pets
 
Travel
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
MEDICAL
 
Anatomy
 
Essays
 
Ethics
 
Healing
 
Urology
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Adult
 
Amish
 
Atheism
 
Baptist
 
Eastern
 
Essays
 
Ethics
 
Faith
 
History
 
History
 
Prayer
 
Sikhism
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Biography & Autobiography - Personal Memoirs
 
Sort By: Products per Page:
  12345   [NEXT > >] Displaying 1 to 15 of 1000+
By Susan Savion
Though Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton are well-known historical names, that of Matilda Joslyn Gage usually evokes the response, "Who?" Yet, this amazing woman contributed equally for many years as part of a triumvirate with Anthony and Stanton. Matilda was involved in the women’s movement from 1852 until her death in 1898. She became a noted speaker and writer on woman's suffrage. She was born in upstate New York to an abolitionist family. Indeed, her childhood home and her later Greek Revival home (now a museum dedicated to her) in Fayetteville, New York were both stops on the Underground Railroad. She was best known for her feminist and suffragist activities, but she was “written out of history” for many years, because she was considered by her peers to be too radical in all she proposed to accomplish. Inspired by the Haudenosaunee women who were her neighbors and who adopted her into their wolf clan, she was determined to gain the rights of property ownership, governance and equality of power for her 19th century sisterhood. She fought for the rights of Native Americans and enslaved persons and anyone else impacted by government control. She championed women inventors and was the inspiration behind her son-in-law L. Frank Baum's 14 Oz books. She had a life-long desire for justice and equality for all and was connected to the ideas of Theosophy. This moved her to take on the inequality of women in religious institutions. Along with Stanton, Gage published The Woman’s Bible. Her book, Women, Church and State was judged as "going too far" by many. You will find her immensely quotable!
FORMAT: Softcover
OUR PRICE:
$16.95
By May A. Rihani

May Rihani’s book is proof of the emptiness of three stereotypes: she challenges the idea that Arab women are submissive, that there are no democracies in the Middle East, and the notion of a “clash of civilizations.” Her life demonstrates global leadership by a Lebanese Arab woman, and her memoir describes a golden age in Lebanon when democracy and freedom of expression were taken for granted. Perhaps most importantly, Cultures Without Borders finds the common ground among cultures despite apparent differences. This is an eyewitness account of the rich and profound goodness in humanity.

H.E. Amine Gemayel, former President of Lebanon

Cultures Without Borders contains important lessons for all those who aspire to live as productive global citizens in the twenty-first century. On the macro level, May Rihani’s book demonstrates the falsity of the “clash of civilizations” theory that posits inevitable conflict between peoples of differing cultures. Instead, through personal anecdotes and authoritative evidence drawn from real-world experiences, she demonstrates the universality of the impulse to transcend frontiers of the mind and connect peacefully with “the other” through education and dialogue.

Suheil Bushrui, Professor Emeritus, University of Maryland

I have never met anyone who so adeptly mixes academics, philosophy, technical know-how, advocacy, and common sense like May Rihani. I have watched with awe as she has applied her unique set of skills and made a difference in the lives of women and girls around the world. Stephanie Funk, USAID Mission Director, Zimbabwe Weaving between poetry and politics; evoking the intimacy of family and the openness of public service; at once struggling for local girls’ education/poverty alleviation and negotiating with World Bank and UN officers; laboring every day for economic development for women and yet running high romance with Romeo lovers; conversing equally with illiterate village friends and global leaders – May Rihani invites us into a Lebanese and American garden throbbing with its unfolding mystery; enchanted by fragrances of East, West and South; and exhilarated by the empowering possibility of a life lived fully every moment and yet always with an eye to the possibilities ahead.  She humbles, she empowers, she inspires.

 

Suad Joseph, Distinguished Research Professor, University of California, Davis


FORMAT: Softcover
OUR PRICE:
$26.95
By May A. Rihani

May Rihani’s book is proof of the emptiness of three stereotypes: she challenges the idea that Arab women are submissive, that there are no democracies in the Middle East, and the notion of a “clash of civilizations.” Her life demonstrates global leadership by a Lebanese Arab woman, and her memoir describes a golden age in Lebanon when democracy and freedom of expression were taken for granted. Perhaps most importantly, Cultures Without Borders finds the common ground among cultures despite apparent differences. This is an eyewitness account of the rich and profound goodness in humanity.

H.E. Amine Gemayel, former President of Lebanon

Cultures Without Borders contains important lessons for all those who aspire to live as productive global citizens in the twenty-first century. On the macro level, May Rihani’s book demonstrates the falsity of the “clash of civilizations” theory that posits inevitable conflict between peoples of differing cultures. Instead, through personal anecdotes and authoritative evidence drawn from real-world experiences, she demonstrates the universality of the impulse to transcend frontiers of the mind and connect peacefully with “the other” through education and dialogue.

Suheil Bushrui, Professor Emeritus, University of Maryland

I have never met anyone who so adeptly mixes academics, philosophy, technical know-how, advocacy, and common sense like May Rihani. I have watched with awe as she has applied her unique set of skills and made a difference in the lives of women and girls around the world. Stephanie Funk, USAID Mission Director, Zimbabwe Weaving between poetry and politics; evoking the intimacy of family and the openness of public service; at once struggling for local girls’ education/poverty alleviation and negotiating with World Bank and UN officers; laboring every day for economic development for women and yet running high romance with Romeo lovers; conversing equally with illiterate village friends and global leaders – May Rihani invites us into a Lebanese and American garden throbbing with its unfolding mystery; enchanted by fragrances of East, West and South; and exhilarated by the empowering possibility of a life lived fully every moment and yet always with an eye to the possibilities ahead.  She humbles, she empowers, she inspires.

 

Suad Joseph, Distinguished Research Professor, University of California, Davis


FORMAT: Hardcover
OUR PRICE:
$35.99
By Bugs B
Being a dancer/stripper is no easy walk in the park. The people you meet are sometimes the ones you try to avoid in everyday life. But it also can be fun and exciting, depending on who you meet. This book is my diary of my experiences working at a bikini bar in California. I share my conversations with customers as well as with other girls in the dressing room. I give light to our world because no one really knows what we go through as dancers, mothers, daughters, friends, and even sugar babies. From arguing with each other about what was said behind someone's back, to being jealous about a certain customer. This book shares all the juicy details you would want to hear from a dancer/stripper.

FORMAT: E-Book
OUR PRICE:
$3.99
By Dick Immel
For Dick and Kathi Immel, life was changing at an uncomfortably fast pace. The Immels had started a family soon after Dick completed his service in the Korean War then took a job as the director of housing at Chico State in Northern California to be near Dick’s parents. Now it’s 1966, and they discover that they are not prepared to let go of the “father knows best” approach to life that the students in Chico have so unceremoniously shoved aside. Situations like student protests and drugs abound. Dick has not been trained to deal with these issues, and Kathi, prone to psychological breakdowns, can’t deal with the constant stress. A switch to teaching at a junior high school calms things down. But then dread sets in when Merreli, their ordinarily cheerful fifth-grade daughter, comes home one day disturbed about peer pressure to try drugs. Looking for an escape to a place where good old-fashioned family values still thrive, Dick becomes interested in the “back-to-the-land” movement advocated by the new magazine “Mother Earth News.” Before they know it, the whole family of five is packed into the Plymouth station wagon and heading to Maine. The next decade is filled with life lessons—some humorous and others, deadly serious—as the young family discovers that the “simple life” is not quite so simple after all. Although the Immels are dubbed Damn Californians by the neighbor who helps them out of one predicament after another, they learn what granite strength of character it takes to survive the severe winters and thrive on the rocky land so far away from California’s sunny shores. Dick Immel’s matter-of-fact tone, down-to-earth sense of humor, and gifted storytelling combine to make his memoir a delightful read celebrating the pioneering determination that is one of America’s most enduring strengths. It’s inspiring, for if this bunch can start a new life and overcome so many unforeseen obstacles, so can you!
FORMAT: E-Book
OUR PRICE:
$3.99
By Vladimir Radovic
Based on the author's Day-Timer notebooks, this collection of episodes records a process of getting acquainted with an influential manager in a multicultural environment. Set in four countries of the Western hemisphere, the chapters describe the human side of unusual events and relationships. Within the context of international financial affairs, the story gradually reveals a remarkable life story of migration from the old to the new continent. The book is not only entertaining and easy to read but is highly instructive and relevant for the practice of management and teamwork in any multinational organization.
FORMAT: E-Book
OUR PRICE:
$3.99
By Caren S. Dillman

Why, when we live in a sexually obsessed culture, do we hide our sexual brokenness?

So many children are emotionally abandoned after abuse and left to navigate their way alone through life, struggling to find sexual wholeness. It takes a great deal of courage to confront an abuser. The shame, along with the lie that we are not good enough, lingers long after the abuse. I believe it is what fuels the secrets. If victims were able to tell their stories safely and freely, I believe they would be able to heal far more easily from childhood abuse.

“What a great example of ‘You have to live it if you’re going to give it.’ Caren has helped all of us live it better.”

Stephen Arterburn, Founder of New Life Ministries

“I Lost My Marbles is an authentic, vulnerable look at a journey no one ever signs up to take. Written with courage and honesty, Caren Dillman’s story reveals the abuse that many suffer at the hand of a trusted loved one. Her book is also a humorous and candid love story, and a narrative of faith that is developed in the midst of the storm. The powerful conclusion will take your breath away.”

Gayle M. Samples, PhD

Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist | Executive Director at Emmaus Road Counseling

“A powerful read, presented with honesty and hope. Caren Dillman’s unflinching narrative of trauma strikes deep in the heart. We feel her pain, her shame, and her confusion. We cheer her victories. Most of all, we come away with a profound appreciation for the author’s story and her willingness to bring it into the light.”

Tammy Fletcher, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist

www.fletchertherapy.com

“Everybody's got a story to tell and everybody's got a wound to be healed.” The first time I heard those lyrics sung by the artist Plump, I wanted to declare, “Yes we all have a story to tell and we all have wounds to heal. A light needs to be shined on the truth and our stories need to be told!” Imagine what could happen if we believed we were safe to share our stories without consequences of judgment or rejection? Our freedom and path towards healing would be liberating. When I first heard that song I was in the middle of writing my own healing story and I was again facing another roadblock. The fear that kept hindering me were questions such as, “how will other’s respond to my story, will it make a difference to anyone else? Can I risk being real enough so that my story will offer hope to others?” When I faced those roadblocks I reminded myself what I had read from the Bible: “You must be very careful not to forget the things you have seen God do for you. Keep reminding yourselves, and tell your children and grandchildren as well.” Deut 4:9 (CEV) It would be years after struggling through my own recovery before I would take the risk to share what God had done for me. Like many people I felt isolated in my pain. I worked hard to hide the parts of myself that I believed would be rejected. I had repressed most of the sexual abuse from my childhood. I was unable to make the connection that the abuse had done damage which made it easy for me to believe that I was unworthy of love and acceptance. Childhood sexual abuse results in long-term side effects. One of them includes the risk of re-victimization. It creates serious problems for the individual, their family and society. Adult women with a history of childhood sexual abuse are more likely to suffer from depression, eating disorders, poor self esteem, and suicidal thoughts as well as other problems. Although the heightened anxiety I’ve lived with has been challenging, the most significant effect was my inability to be comfortable in an intimate relationship with God. I had to learn that the shame I had lived with did not belong to me. It belonged to those who were the victimizers. And as is often too common, out of the shame and subsequent secrets I was left feeling confused and unworthy. At times in my life, when it was obvious that I needed to work on healing from betrayal and hurts I was unaware how extensive the plague of childhood abuse is in our society. Twenty-five years ago I learned that one out of every three girls will be sexually abused before the age eighteen. The statistic is nearly the same for boys will be abused? With increase awareness and knowledge, along with advances in education and treatment, the epidemic hasn’t decreased but rather increased. Who would have imagined that in America we would be faced with sexual slavery and trafficking of young girls? However, the stats don’t tell the extent of the problem. How many children, teens and adults have never told anyone their story? So why, when we live in a sexually obsessed culture, do we continue to hide our sexual brokenness? I know that so many children are emotionally abandoned after abuse and left to navigate their way alone through life, struggling to find sexual wholeness. I’ve heard and read their stories. It takes a great deal of courage to confront an abuser. I discovered that shame, along with the infamous lie that we’re not good enough, lingers long after the abuse. I believe it is what fuels the secrets. If victims were able to tell their stories safely and freely, and were believed, I believe they would be able to heal far more easily from childhood abuse. Through my own therapy work and as a psychotherapist to many others I began to recognize that there are many other factors that contribute to a child growing up without self-esteem and without confidence. Even an environment without overt sexual abuse can still be invalidating. I knew I couldn’t pass onto my children what I did not possess. I couldn’t teach them to love themselves if I secretly hated who I was. I had to find a way to parent differently than was role modeled for me. We all make mistakes as parents. The mistakes alone are not what contribute to hurting our children. It’s the unwillingness to own them and seek to do differently. At any point in time either one of my parents could have chosen to respond differently to me. They chose to reject me over seeking conflict resolution. It was left up to me to navigate through the tricky path of forgiveness. It was a slow process that happened gradually in stages. I hung onto the hope that one day they would come to me and ask forgiveness. As a licensed marriage and family therapist, I’ve heard individual’s stories all the time. Someone would come into my office and one of the first things I wanted to know was, “what is your story? What were you hoping to gain by coming here? Can I walk along side of you and help you on this journey? All of the stories I hear are as unique and original as the individual client. I have learned to love the process of hearing these stories because I know how healing the telling of them is. Some of what I’m told has been difficult to hear. At times I have been shocked and stunned with what I’ve heard. I am amazed at how they have survived. For many of these clients, I am the first one they risked sharing these stories with. I have shared my personal story in my book, “I Lost My Marbles.” I pray you will find an opportunity to share yours. You can email me at Caren_dillman@hotmail.com.
FORMAT: E-Book
OUR PRICE:
$3.99
By Vladimir Radovic
Based on the author's Day-Timer notebooks, this collection of episodes records a process of getting acquainted with an influential manager in a multicultural environment. Set in four countries of the Western hemisphere, the chapters describe the human side of unusual events and relationships. Within the context of international financial affairs, the story gradually reveals a remarkable life story of migration from the old to the new continent. The book is not only entertaining and easy to read but is highly instructive and relevant for the practice of management and teamwork in any multinational organization.
FORMAT: Softcover
OUR PRICE:
$16.95
By Caren S. Dillman

Why, when we live in a sexually obsessed culture, do we hide our sexual brokenness?

So many children are emotionally abandoned after abuse and left to navigate their way alone through life, struggling to find sexual wholeness. It takes a great deal of courage to confront an abuser. The shame, along with the lie that we are not good enough, lingers long after the abuse. I believe it is what fuels the secrets. If victims were able to tell their stories safely and freely, I believe they would be able to heal far more easily from childhood abuse.

“What a great example of ‘You have to live it if you’re going to give it.’ Caren has helped all of us live it better.”

Stephen Arterburn, Founder of New Life Ministries

“I Lost My Marbles is an authentic, vulnerable look at a journey no one ever signs up to take. Written with courage and honesty, Caren Dillman’s story reveals the abuse that many suffer at the hand of a trusted loved one. Her book is also a humorous and candid love story, and a narrative of faith that is developed in the midst of the storm. The powerful conclusion will take your breath away.”

Gayle M. Samples, PhD

Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist | Executive Director at Emmaus Road Counseling

“A powerful read, presented with honesty and hope. Caren Dillman’s unflinching narrative of trauma strikes deep in the heart. We feel her pain, her shame, and her confusion. We cheer her victories. Most of all, we come away with a profound appreciation for the author’s story and her willingness to bring it into the light.”

Tammy Fletcher, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist

www.fletchertherapy.com

“Everybody's got a story to tell and everybody's got a wound to be healed.” The first time I heard those lyrics sung by the artist Plump, I wanted to declare, “Yes we all have a story to tell and we all have wounds to heal. A light needs to be shined on the truth and our stories need to be told!” Imagine what could happen if we believed we were safe to share our stories without consequences of judgment or rejection? Our freedom and path towards healing would be liberating. When I first heard that song I was in the middle of writing my own healing story and I was again facing another roadblock. The fear that kept hindering me were questions such as, “how will other’s respond to my story, will it make a difference to anyone else? Can I risk being real enough so that my story will offer hope to others?” When I faced those roadblocks I reminded myself what I had read from the Bible: “You must be very careful not to forget the things you have seen God do for you. Keep reminding yourselves, and tell your children and grandchildren as well.” Deut 4:9 (CEV) It would be years after struggling through my own recovery before I would take the risk to share what God had done for me. Like many people I felt isolated in my pain. I worked hard to hide the parts of myself that I believed would be rejected. I had repressed most of the sexual abuse from my childhood. I was unable to make the connection that the abuse had done damage which made it easy for me to believe that I was unworthy of love and acceptance. Childhood sexual abuse results in long-term side effects. One of them includes the risk of re-victimization. It creates serious problems for the individual, their family and society. Adult women with a history of childhood sexual abuse are more likely to suffer from depression, eating disorders, poor self esteem, and suicidal thoughts as well as other problems. Although the heightened anxiety I’ve lived with has been challenging, the most significant effect was my inability to be comfortable in an intimate relationship with God. I had to learn that the shame I had lived with did not belong to me. It belonged to those who were the victimizers. And as is often too common, out of the shame and subsequent secrets I was left feeling confused and unworthy. At times in my life, when it was obvious that I needed to work on healing from betrayal and hurts I was unaware how extensive the plague of childhood abuse is in our society. Twenty-five years ago I learned that one out of every three girls will be sexually abused before the age eighteen. The statistic is nearly the same for boys will be abused? With increase awareness and knowledge, along with advances in education and treatment, the epidemic hasn’t decreased but rather increased. Who would have imagined that in America we would be faced with sexual slavery and trafficking of young girls? However, the stats don’t tell the extent of the problem. How many children, teens and adults have never told anyone their story? So why, when we live in a sexually obsessed culture, do we continue to hide our sexual brokenness? I know that so many children are emotionally abandoned after abuse and left to navigate their way alone through life, struggling to find sexual wholeness. I’ve heard and read their stories. It takes a great deal of courage to confront an abuser. I discovered that shame, along with the infamous lie that we’re not good enough, lingers long after the abuse. I believe it is what fuels the secrets. If victims were able to tell their stories safely and freely, and were believed, I believe they would be able to heal far more easily from childhood abuse. Through my own therapy work and as a psychotherapist to many others I began to recognize that there are many other factors that contribute to a child growing up without self-esteem and without confidence. Even an environment without overt sexual abuse can still be invalidating. I knew I couldn’t pass onto my children what I did not possess. I couldn’t teach them to love themselves if I secretly hated who I was. I had to find a way to parent differently than was role modeled for me. We all make mistakes as parents. The mistakes alone are not what contribute to hurting our children. It’s the unwillingness to own them and seek to do differently. At any point in time either one of my parents could have chosen to respond differently to me. They chose to reject me over seeking conflict resolution. It was left up to me to navigate through the tricky path of forgiveness. It was a slow process that happened gradually in stages. I hung onto the hope that one day they would come to me and ask forgiveness. As a licensed marriage and family therapist, I’ve heard individual’s stories all the time. Someone would come into my office and one of the first things I wanted to know was, “what is your story? What were you hoping to gain by coming here? Can I walk along side of you and help you on this journey? All of the stories I hear are as unique and original as the individual client. I have learned to love the process of hearing these stories because I know how healing the telling of them is. Some of what I’m told has been difficult to hear. At times I have been shocked and stunned with what I’ve heard. I am amazed at how they have survived. For many of these clients, I am the first one they risked sharing these stories with. I have shared my personal story in my book, “I Lost My Marbles.” I pray you will find an opportunity to share yours. You can email me at Caren_dillman@hotmail.com.
FORMAT: Hardcover
OUR PRICE:
$20.39
By Caren S. Dillman

Why, when we live in a sexually obsessed culture, do we hide our sexual brokenness?

So many children are emotionally abandoned after abuse and left to navigate their way alone through life, struggling to find sexual wholeness. It takes a great deal of courage to confront an abuser. The shame, along with the lie that we are not good enough, lingers long after the abuse. I believe it is what fuels the secrets. If victims were able to tell their stories safely and freely, I believe they would be able to heal far more easily from childhood abuse.

“What a great example of ‘You have to live it if you’re going to give it.’ Caren has helped all of us live it better.”

Stephen Arterburn, Founder of New Life Ministries

“I Lost My Marbles is an authentic, vulnerable look at a journey no one ever signs up to take. Written with courage and honesty, Caren Dillman’s story reveals the abuse that many suffer at the hand of a trusted loved one. Her book is also a humorous and candid love story, and a narrative of faith that is developed in the midst of the storm. The powerful conclusion will take your breath away.”

Gayle M. Samples, PhD

Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist | Executive Director at Emmaus Road Counseling

“A powerful read, presented with honesty and hope. Caren Dillman’s unflinching narrative of trauma strikes deep in the heart. We feel her pain, her shame, and her confusion. We cheer her victories. Most of all, we come away with a profound appreciation for the author’s story and her willingness to bring it into the light.”

Tammy Fletcher, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist

www.fletchertherapy.com

“Everybody's got a story to tell and everybody's got a wound to be healed.” The first time I heard those lyrics sung by the artist Plump, I wanted to declare, “Yes we all have a story to tell and we all have wounds to heal. A light needs to be shined on the truth and our stories need to be told!” Imagine what could happen if we believed we were safe to share our stories without consequences of judgment or rejection? Our freedom and path towards healing would be liberating. When I first heard that song I was in the middle of writing my own healing story and I was again facing another roadblock. The fear that kept hindering me were questions such as, “how will other’s respond to my story, will it make a difference to anyone else? Can I risk being real enough so that my story will offer hope to others?” When I faced those roadblocks I reminded myself what I had read from the Bible: “You must be very careful not to forget the things you have seen God do for you. Keep reminding yourselves, and tell your children and grandchildren as well.” Deut 4:9 (CEV) It would be years after struggling through my own recovery before I would take the risk to share what God had done for me. Like many people I felt isolated in my pain. I worked hard to hide the parts of myself that I believed would be rejected. I had repressed most of the sexual abuse from my childhood. I was unable to make the connection that the abuse had done damage which made it easy for me to believe that I was unworthy of love and acceptance. Childhood sexual abuse results in long-term side effects. One of them includes the risk of re-victimization. It creates serious problems for the individual, their family and society. Adult women with a history of childhood sexual abuse are more likely to suffer from depression, eating disorders, poor self esteem, and suicidal thoughts as well as other problems. Although the heightened anxiety I’ve lived with has been challenging, the most significant effect was my inability to be comfortable in an intimate relationship with God. I had to learn that the shame I had lived with did not belong to me. It belonged to those who were the victimizers. And as is often too common, out of the shame and subsequent secrets I was left feeling confused and unworthy. At times in my life, when it was obvious that I needed to work on healing from betrayal and hurts I was unaware how extensive the plague of childhood abuse is in our society. Twenty-five years ago I learned that one out of every three girls will be sexually abused before the age eighteen. The statistic is nearly the same for boys will be abused? With increase awareness and knowledge, along with advances in education and treatment, the epidemic hasn’t decreased but rather increased. Who would have imagined that in America we would be faced with sexual slavery and trafficking of young girls? However, the stats don’t tell the extent of the problem. How many children, teens and adults have never told anyone their story? So why, when we live in a sexually obsessed culture, do we continue to hide our sexual brokenness? I know that so many children are emotionally abandoned after abuse and left to navigate their way alone through life, struggling to find sexual wholeness. I’ve heard and read their stories. It takes a great deal of courage to confront an abuser. I discovered that shame, along with the infamous lie that we’re not good enough, lingers long after the abuse. I believe it is what fuels the secrets. If victims were able to tell their stories safely and freely, and were believed, I believe they would be able to heal far more easily from childhood abuse. Through my own therapy work and as a psychotherapist to many others I began to recognize that there are many other factors that contribute to a child growing up without self-esteem and without confidence. Even an environment without overt sexual abuse can still be invalidating. I knew I couldn’t pass onto my children what I did not possess. I couldn’t teach them to love themselves if I secretly hated who I was. I had to find a way to parent differently than was role modeled for me. We all make mistakes as parents. The mistakes alone are not what contribute to hurting our children. It’s the unwillingness to own them and seek to do differently. At any point in time either one of my parents could have chosen to respond differently to me. They chose to reject me over seeking conflict resolution. It was left up to me to navigate through the tricky path of forgiveness. It was a slow process that happened gradually in stages. I hung onto the hope that one day they would come to me and ask forgiveness. As a licensed marriage and family therapist, I’ve heard individual’s stories all the time. Someone would come into my office and one of the first things I wanted to know was, “what is your story? What were you hoping to gain by coming here? Can I walk along side of you and help you on this journey? All of the stories I hear are as unique and original as the individual client. I have learned to love the process of hearing these stories because I know how healing the telling of them is. Some of what I’m told has been difficult to hear. At times I have been shocked and stunned with what I’ve heard. I am amazed at how they have survived. For many of these clients, I am the first one they risked sharing these stories with. I have shared my personal story in my book, “I Lost My Marbles.” I pray you will find an opportunity to share yours. You can email me at Caren_dillman@hotmail.com.
FORMAT: Softcover
OUR PRICE:
$14.95
By Lowell E. White
Diamonds and Perils is about the life of World War ll Navy veteran Johnny Cantrell of Bremen, Georgia, which started when his fellow Navy vet urged the author to write a newspaper article about him. Johnny spent little time in the Navy compared to career veterans due to the crushing toll taken on his diminutive body by the world’s most horrible conflict. Despite a hearing loss and a long recovery from battle fatigue, his legacy as a faithful member of what Tom Brokaw called The Greatest Generation is assured. Johnny joined in the capture of Iwo Jima, Okinawa, the Marianas, and other Pacific islands, witnessing the hoisting of the Stars and Stripes over Mt. Suribachi. His strict Methodist upbringing, the Boy Scout skills he learned, and family work ethic in the agricultural south of the twenties, thirties, and forties stood him in good stead as Quartermaster on a landing craft, without which the U.S. Marines could not have functioned. Johnny tells in a riveting fashion how milking cows, church life, camp experiences, hard work, and even funny happenings all helped facilitate his military competence and character when bombs and bullets started flying. Although he was never shot and never killed an enemy, he faced the deafening noise and fear produced by war. He came home a nervous wreck with a severe hearing deficit, but because of his innate abilities and the mentorship of his older brother, he became a highly successful businessman, dealing in diamonds and pearls; hence the title Diamonds and Perils.

FORMAT: E-Book
OUR PRICE:
$3.99
By Roxanna Jones
I lived through the darkest episodes of manic depression. My story is true and very detailed about my episodes. Some of what you read will probably make you laugh, and other parts are dark but need to be told. Maybe you know someone who is bipolar or you yourself suffer from this illness. I believe my honest story will help you understand what it is to be bipolar. It has taken me ten years to build the courage to put my story out there. If it helps even one person, I will know it was worth it.
FORMAT: E-Book
OUR PRICE:
$3.99
By Jacqueline Clay Chester
Can you imagine one day being on an airplane, flying from your hometown in the USA to the city of Moscow in the Soviet Union? Well, it's not a story you hear very often but it happened to an African-American college student from Brooklyn, New York - with extended family in the deep south - who traveled to Moscow, Russia during the Cold War to “rip the runway!” Atlanta-based author and playwright Jacqueline Clay Chester, spent seven weeks in Russia as a runway model for the American National Exhibition in Moscow. The twice daily fashion shows were a major attraction offering thousands of Russians a glimpse of life in the United States. How did Jacqueline's life experiences prepare her for this awesome adventure? What reaction did her family have to such a journey? As an African American would she find acceptance? Did Russia have a double standard when dealing with issues of race? If English was not spoken and Russian was not understood, what common thread united the two cultures? Black Girl in Moscow, A Memoir by Jacqueline Clay Chester, speaks about her experiences as a visitor to Russia during one of the most volatile times in history and like opening the Matrovskia dolls, the memories unfold one after the other!
FORMAT: Hardcover
OUR PRICE:
$23.99
By Jacqueline Clay Chester
Can you imagine one day being on an airplane, flying from your hometown in the USA to the city of Moscow in the Soviet Union? Well, it's not a story you hear very often but it happened to an African-American college student from Brooklyn, New York - with extended family in the deep south - who traveled to Moscow, Russia during the Cold War to “rip the runway!” Atlanta-based author and playwright Jacqueline Clay Chester, spent seven weeks in Russia as a runway model for the American National Exhibition in Moscow. The twice daily fashion shows were a major attraction offering thousands of Russians a glimpse of life in the United States. How did Jacqueline's life experiences prepare her for this awesome adventure? What reaction did her family have to such a journey? As an African American would she find acceptance? Did Russia have a double standard when dealing with issues of race? If English was not spoken and Russian was not understood, what common thread united the two cultures? Black Girl in Moscow, A Memoir by Jacqueline Clay Chester, speaks about her experiences as a visitor to Russia during one of the most volatile times in history and like opening the Matrovskia dolls, the memories unfold one after the other!
FORMAT: Softcover
OUR PRICE:
$14.95
By Roxanna Jones
I lived through the darkest episodes of manic depression. My story is true and very detailed about my episodes. Some of what you read will probably make you laugh, and other parts are dark but need to be told. Maybe you know someone who is bipolar or you yourself suffer from this illness. I believe my honest story will help you understand what it is to be bipolar. It has taken me ten years to build the courage to put my story out there. If it helps even one person, I will know it was worth it.
FORMAT: Softcover
OUR PRICE:
$12.95
  12345   [NEXT > >] Displaying 1 to 15 of 1000+